Home / Weekly News / Coming Techs of this week: 27 August 2017
World's first trigonometry

Coming Techs of this week: 27 August 2017

Robot 

OptoForce: a better way of sensors for robots

OptoForceRobotics technology provider of multi-axis force and torque sensors OptoForce has renamed its HEX-70-XE-200N and HEX-70-XH-200N end-of-arm robot sensors. Both also include several new enhancements — though the sensors’ prices will remain the same. [More]

MIT Robogami Lets You Design 3D-Printed Robots in Minutes

MIT RobogamiResearchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) are getting closer to doing exactly that. In a new paper, they present a system called “Interactive Robogami” that lets you design a robot in minutes, and then 3D-print and assemble it in as little as four hours.[More]

 

Artificial Intelligence

Using Artificial Intelligence To Keep Drugs Safe

Using Artificial Intelligence To Keep Drugs SafeXavier University is hosting pharmaceutical and computer companies Thursday and Friday for a conference that will focus on artificial intelligence (AI). AI may be key in preventing contaminated drugs, according to the Director of Xavier Health Marla Phillips. “It can recognize connections from data that might seem irrelevant to a human and identify that it is producing a signal that could lead to a flawed product. [More]

Researchers built an invisible backdoor to hack AI’s decisions

invisible backdoorA team of NYU researchers has discovered a way to manipulate the artificial intelligence that powers self-driving cars and image recognition by installing a secret backdoor into the software. [More]

 

New Discovery

Researchers turn profit ‘killing cancer cells and healing wounds’ with bioelectrics

Andrei PakhomovOld Dominion University’s path-breaking bioelectrics work, which has demonstrated the ability to kill cancer cells and heal wounds, has generated more than $41 million for the University and its researchers. [More]

 

Study identifies promising drug candidate for treating demyelinating diseases

drug candidateOsaka University researchers show FGF21, a factor secreted by the pancreas, promotes remyelination in the central nervous system after injury. Brain functions are maintained by the neural network. Neural network is formed by the connection between the neurite, and this connection is supported by the wrapping of myelin. Demyelination is detected in the patients of several diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, and is associated with neurological dysfunctions. [More]

 

Business & Startup

Elon Musk’s brain interface startup Neuralink files $27M fundraise

brain interfaceElon Musk wants to connect your brain directly to a computer, and investors are ready to make that science fiction a reality. Musk’s startup Neuralink has raised the $26.96 million of a technically still-open funding round that could grow to $100 million, according to a new SEC filing. However, Musk himself tweets that Neuralink is no longer raising cash. [More]

 

Science & Technology

Thorium could power the next generation of nuclear reactors

ThoriumThorium has long held promise for “safer” nuclear power. A slightly radioactive element, it converts to fissionable U-233 when hit by high-energy neutrons. But after use, U-233 has fewer long-lived waste products than conventional U-235 now used in nuclear power plants. It’s also exceedingly difficult to reprocess thorium into plutonium. [More]

World’s first trigonometry revealed in ancient Babylonian tablet

World's first trigonometryThe ancient Babylonians – who lived from about 4,000 BCE in what is now Iraq – had a long forgotten understanding of right-angled triangles that was much simpler and more accurate than the conventional trigonometry we are taught in schools. Our new research, published in Historia Mathematica, shows that the Babylonians were able to construct a trigonometric table using only the exact ratios of sides of a right-angled triangle. [More]

Scientists make breakthrough in magnesium batteries

magnesium batteriesA new study by the University of Houston offers promise for the use of magnesium batteries as a safer alternative to problem-plagued lithium ion batteries. High voltage lithium ion batteries are the current standard but they are expensive and can develop breaches in their internal structure, known as dendrite growths, causing them to catch on fire, which has become an increasing problem. [More]

 

 


Find new and coming technologies at our site: http://comingtechs.com . Please subscribe at our news form and add RSS to your favorite news reader.

About newsdesk

At ComingTechs, we highlight new technological discoveries and share their success stories via our online platform. Additionally, our platform serves as a bridge to help the scientist and technologist build the strategy, and offers a method to bring their discoveries to the market and society.

Check Also

SXSW was all about blockchain dreamers

SXSW was all about blockchain dreamers

This year’s SXSW was all about blockchain dreamers, cryptocurrency scammers, and everything in between The …

WP2FB Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com
Skip to toolbar